3D Printed Electronics About to Get Even Smaller

A new development in 2D printed electronics could significantly reduce the size of electronics, making 2D printed electronics all the more viable and fully developed.  The breakthrough involves using atomically thin perovskites.  The research group behind this comes out of Japan.

From Printed Electronics World

WPI-MANA has developed the world’s highest performance dielectric nanofilms using atomically thin perovskites. This technology may revolutionize the next-generation of electronics. This research was conducted by a WPI-MANA research group led by Principal Investigator Minoru Osada and Director Takayoshi Sasaki of WPI-MANA at NIMS. Electronic devices are getting smaller all the time, but there is a limit to how small they can get using current materials and technology.

High-κ dielectric materials may be the key for developing electronic devices of the future. Minoru Osada and colleagues created high-performance dielectric nanofilms using 2D perovskite nanosheets (Ca2Nam−3NbmO3m+1; m = 3-6) as building blocks. Perovskite oxides offer tremendous potential for controlling their rich variety of electronic properties including high-κ dielectric and ferroelectric. The researchers demonstrated the targeted synthesis of nanofilms composed of 2D perovskite nanosheets in a unit-cell-upon-unit-cell manner.

In this unique system, perovskite nanosheets enable precise control over the thickness of the perovskite layers in increments of ~0.4 nm (one perovskite unit) by changing m, and such atomic layer engineering enhances the high-κ dielectric response and local ferroelectric instability. The m = 6 member (Ca2Na3Nb6O19) attained the highest dielectric constant, εr = ~470, ever realized in all known dielectrics in the ultrathin region of less than 10 nm…..

Perovskite nanosheets are of technological importance for exploring high-κ dielectrics in 2D materials, which have great potential in electronic applications such as memories, capacitors, and gate devices.

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Definition of high-k dailectrics:

The term high-κ dielectric refers to a material with a high dielectric constant κ (as compared to silicon dioxide). High-κ dielectrics are used in semiconductor manufacturing processes where they are usually used to replace a silicon dioxide gate dielectric or another dielectric layer of a device. The implementation of high-κ gate dielectrics is one of several strategies developed to allow further miniaturization of microelectronic components, colloquially referred to as extending Moore’s Law.

Sometimes these materials are called “high-k” instead of “high-κ” (high kappa).

Definition of Gate Devices:
For small-scale logic, designers now use prefabricated logic gates from families of devices such as the TTL 7400 series by Texas Instruments, the CMOS 4000 series by RCA, and their more recent descendants. Increasingly, these fixed-function logic gates are being replaced by programmable logic devices, which allow designers to pack a large number of mixed logic gates into a single integrated circuit. The field-programmable nature of programmable logic devices such as FPGAs has reduced the ‘hard’ property of hardware; it is now possible to change the logic design of a hardware system by reprogramming some of its components, thus allowing the features or function of a hardware implementation of a logic system to be changed.

 

 

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