Arcade Fire’s ‘Millenial Whoop’ Lawsuit Demonstrates All that is Wrong with IP

The popular band Arcade Fire is claiming ownership over a musical pattern, a pattern that goes 5-3-5, dubbed the “Millenial Whoop,” it has become popular in a lot of songs.  And for that, Arcade Fire wants to cut into everyone’s pie who used the musical progressiion 5-3-5.  The band was emboldened by this YouTube video to press forward with the charges:

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That’s right, Arcade Fire wants to own that musical phrase, and they’re serious about it.  The fact that these creative wonderkinds somehow think that they can own a musical phrase as simple as this goes to show you how effective government schools have been at ‘helping’ people think in authoritatian, anti-human, anti-liberty, anti-creative terms.  One can only hope that the suffer the same fate as the Fine Brothers, who lost hundreds of thousands of YouTube subscribers after attempting to claim copyright ownership of the concept of React Videos.

Read my commetnary on this here;
https://steemit.com/news/@paulgordon/six-shooters-prove-ip-is-death-to-liberty-innovation 

 

from billlboard.co

Legal representation for Arcade Fire has confirmed that the “Everything Now” hitmakers have filed a series of intellectual property and copyright lawsuits this week. In what could be a precedent-setting decision, the band has left it up to a judge to determine whether or not they invented the so-called Millennial Whoop.

“After careful and sometimes agonizing consideration,” says Jared Fleming, Arcade Fire’s longtime lawyer, “the band contends their signature ‘Wa-oh-wa-oh’ sequence has been plagiarized by several top acts, and therefore seeks fair and just compensation.” Arcade Fire claim that artists from Katy Perry to Fall Out Boy owe their success in part to their wrongful use of the euphoric snippet. Proof, they say, comes in the form of their 2004 hit “Wake Up,” which showcases the rousing sequence, which the band created in the summer of 2002 in a church in Montreal that served as their rehearsal studio. A video of the precise creative process has been submitted as evidence along with their legal actions.

Musician and product manager Patrick Metzger coined the phrase “Millennial Whoop” in a blog post in 2016. “I can tell you, upon reading Mr. Metzger’s canny analysis, the band felt quite vindicated,” says Fleming. “In fact, it motivated them to finally pursue the case and defend what is undoubtedly their intellectual property.” As both Metzer and the various suits filed by Arcade Fire argue, the Millennial Whoop musical sequence alternates between the fifth and third notes of a major scale, typically starting on the fifth, while the rhythm is usually straight 8th-notes, starting either on the downbeat or on the upbeat. A singer typically belts these notes with an “Oh” phoneme, often in a “Wa-oh-wa-oh” pattern—precisely, the band claims, the trademark sound of “Wake Up,” which appears in nearly all their subsequent hit songs.

read more http://www.billlboard.co/articles/news/7865084/arcade-fire-suing-artists-millennial-whoop/

 

Arcade Fire files multiple legal claims over ‘Millenial Whoop’

Legal representation for Arcade Fire has confirmed that the “Everyone Now” hitmakers have filed a series of intellectual property and copyright lawsuits this week. In what could be a precedent-setting decision, the band has left it up to a judge to determine whether or not they invented the so-calle…

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About Paul Gordon 1358 Articles

Paul Gordon is the publisher and editor of iState.TV. He has published and edited newspapers, poetry magazines and online weekly magazines.
He is the director of Social Cognito, an SEO/Web Marketing Company. You can reach Paul at pg@istate.tv

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