Bioprinting may have taken a hughe leap forward thanks to a research project conducted by a team from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine. The team believes they have found a way to 3D print materials that allow for blood-transporting capillaries to form, something that has been a major impediment to the development of bioprinting.


from http://www.3ders.org/articles/20170711-houston-researchers-grow-functioning-capillaries-move-one-step-closer-to-3d-bioprinting-organs.html

Jul 11, 2017 | By Tess

A joint research team from Houston’s Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine says it is one step closer to creating implantable tissues with functioning capillaries—a crucial step in the direction of 3D printing transplantable tissues and organs.

The research, recently published in the journal Biomaterials Science under the title “Tubulogenesis of co-cultured human iPS-derived endothelial cells and human mesenchymal stem cells in fibrin and gelatin methacrylate gels,” was led by Rice University bioengineer Jordan Miller and Baylor biophysicist Mary Dickinson.

Together, and with their dedicated teams, Miller and Dickinson have demonstrated how to combine human endothelial cells with mesenchymal stem cells to trigger tubulogenesis, a process that enables blood-transporting capillaries to form.

“Our work has important therapeutic implications because we demonstrate utilization of human cells and the ability to live-monitor their tubulogenesis potential as they form primitive vessel networks,” explained Gisele Calderon, a graduate student in Miller’s Physiologic Systems Engineering and Advanced Materials Laboratory and lead author of the study.

“We’ve confirmed that these cells have the capacity to form capillary-like structures, both in a natural material called fibrin and in a semisynthetic material called gelatin methacrylate, or GelMA,” she continued. “The GelMA finding is particularly interesting because it is something we can readily 3D print for future tissue-engineering applications.”

3ders.org – Houston researchers grow functioning capillaries, move one step closer to 3D bioprinting organs | 3D Printer News & 3D Printing News


A joint research team from Houston’s Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine says it is one step closer to creating implantable tissues with functioning capillaries, a crucial step in the direction of 3D printing transplantable tissues and organs.

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