NSA Wants Backdoor Access to All Your Private Digital Data

The National Academy of Science is recommending that government be given backdoor encryption access to all tech as a way to secure everyone’s safety and well-being.  The police-state champion known as the NAS apparently is afraid of individuals having the power to be anonymous.  As we have covered numerous times on this site, anonymity is one of the two great threats to the continued preservation of the monopoly on power that coercive enterprises currently possess.  The other major threat is self-reliance.

From fee.org

The NSA Wants a Skeleton Key to Everyone’s Encrypted Data

In February, the prestigious National Academy of the Sciences (NAS) prepared “A Framework for Decision Makers” addressing encryption. Their solution? You guessed it: exceptional access. Even though their report has slipped under the radar, NAS reports often carry a lot of weight in Congress and within executive agencies, and it seems this one has.

The NAS proposal practically accepts that the federal government should have “backdoor” access, in some way, to all encrypted information.

But, importantly, a key source for the NAS report has cried foul.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (or EFF) is the foremost mainstream defender of the First Amendment online. They are concerned that they were dismissed by the NAS proposal, calling it, “At best, unhelpful.”

The NAS proposal practically accepts that the federal government should have “backdoor” access, in some way, to all encrypted information. They suggest that the proliferation of strong encryption technology at the individual level would only help the bad guys. Exceptional access, however, would entrust the world’s most often hacked government entity with the guardianship of the entire nation’s data, and put companies like Facebook in charge of keeping it otherwise secure.

Even if you do undertake the process of encrypting your own data, something the CIA would consider in and of itself a “red flag,” any executive agency with exceptional access could demand a copy of your combination up-front.

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Paul Gordon is the publisher and editor of iState.TV. He has published and edited newspapers, poetry magazines and online weekly magazines. He is the director of Social Cognito, an SEO/Web Marketing Company. You can reach Paul at pg@istate.tv