Police Site Panics Over Growing Ghost Gun Movement

As anyone who has regularly visited this site may have already figured out, this is not a site that you would expect to share anything from the site policeone.com.  Well, today, prepare yourselves, because I’m going to be dissecting a story the site published called “Untraceable Ghost Guns Concerns Grow Among LE.”

For those of you that like your coercive enterprise just fine, this article might be a bit befuddling for you.  For those that recognize the coercive enterprise for what it is, a business run by owners and managers, a business who forces a product, a service on you whether you want it or not, a business that relies on the willingness of others to apply lethal force when necessary to assure compliance (that is, police and military personnel), you will probably understand this article just fine.

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The folks at Police One write, “a new crop of guns bear no markings of their origin.  They are hand-built in homes and shared workshops, using mail-order parts and drilling machines that range from the rudimentary to the complex. They don’t bear the serial numbers of licensed manufacturers. They are untraceable, hence their nickname: ghost guns.”

Ghost guns go to the heart of the greatest power anyone can actually execute over a coercive enterprise, anonymity.  I wrote about the danger of anonymity in an earlier article.  For people like me, we embrace anonymity, but for the thin blue liners over at Police One, they appear ready to lose their proverbial brown sauce over the possibility of human beings, living so close to them, being able to possess the means of self-defense without having the coercive enterprise, the state, knowing these tools even exist.

They go on to talk about the advances in 3-D printing, and how milling equipment is becoming less expensive and easier to use.  They acknowledge, probably begrudgingly, that making these ‘ghost guns’ is perfectly legal, but they say they are worried that not only will people make their own untraceable guns but, gasp, they might sell these unmarked, unregistered guns in the black market.  And worst, someone might make banned guns.

This article, of course, highlights how schizophrenic it is for those Tea Party Flag Flying  “Patriots” to wave their Molon Labe (Come and Take Them) Flags next to their thin blue line flags (American flags with a police blue line through it that LITERALLY symbolizes a police state).  After all, who do these folks think are the first line of defense for the coercive enterprise to go out and confiscate guns, be they ghost guns or not?  Why, it would be the same people behind the article written on Police One.

Just remember, this article highlights their concern about what ghost guns could potentially enable, the ownership of untraceable guns, enabling people to avoid the onerous background check, and, worst of all, enabling people to own guns the coercive enterprise decides to prohibit people from owning.  So While you’re waving your Molon Labe flag, remember, the police will come and get your guns if they are not registered, if you avoided a background check, if you own a gun the coercive enterprise suddenly decides you shouldn’t have.

To highlight their commitment to do the bidding of the coercive enterprise and assure that only the approved people get the guns, and only the state-licensed people get to sell your guns, let’s take a look at what they wrote about efforts to shut down an operation that dared to manufacture guns without government approval:

 

 

The build-your-own-gun movement took off a few years ago in California, home to some of the strictest gun laws in the nation, and has more recently been spreading to other part of the country, said Paul Ware, counsel for the Los Angeles division of the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. The division spans Southern California, from the Mexico border north to San Luis Obispo.

Ware first heard of the practice a few years ago when an investigator forwarded him a clip from San Diego’s 10 News. A local business was inviting people to make their own AR-15-type weapons around Christmastime. While state law prohibits the sale of the completed rifles, it is not illegal to posses them in specific configurations. A new state law also requires AR-15 owners to register their weapons.

“I watched the video and said ‘That’s interesting,’” Ware said. He researched further and determined the business didn’t have a firearms manufacturing license, which is needed to make guns for sale legally.

“They are no longer in business,” he said. “We told them they needed a license, and they decided not to get a license.”

 

Of course, the article covers the usual scare tactic that ghost guns will enable criminals to literally get away with murder because they won’t have traceable guns to help them figure out who might have committed a crime.  To a certain extent, that’s true, but let’s be honest folks, the amount of cases that hinge on locating the exact gun used in a crime are statistically irrelevant.  The other side of that reality, that the state has the power to track who has what kinds of guns, well, that data runs in the millions upon millions of gun owners that, if and when the state decides to aggressively go after gun owners (like they did during Hurrican Katrina, when they sent around national guard and police to confiscate guns from the people of New Orleans), the effect on your safety and well beling will be far more profound than if a few criminals ‘get away with it.’

Their case for gun manufacturers and dealers being licensed by the government lies around the myth that the federal government doesn’t have a national gun registry.  Of course, by the books they don’t.  They rely on the aggregate databases of gun dealers to check for gun ownership in crimes, or so they say.  But, if they have access to this aggregate of databases owned by businesses that rely on their blessing to stay in businesses then, guess what, they have a national gun database.

Ghost guns are good.  Gun registries are bad.  Government-issued licensing for the manufacturing and selling of weapons is bad.  If you’re flying that Molon Labe flag, you should already know that.  If you already know that, then stop flying that police state flag next to it as these are the people who will LITERALLY Come and Take It, with more guns, bigger guns, because it’s “legal” for them to own tools of self-defense and aggression that you are not legally allowed to own.

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About Paul Gordon 1358 Articles

Paul Gordon is the publisher and editor of iState.TV. He has published and edited newspapers, poetry magazines and online weekly magazines.
He is the director of Social Cognito, an SEO/Web Marketing Company. You can reach Paul at pg@istate.tv

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