Where is the Antimatter from the Big Bang?

Scientists are trying to figure out why they can’t find proof that the Big Bang would have produced antimatter along with matter.  The latest results from an ongoing test haven’t improved that position.

From phys.org

Scientists report first results from neutrino mountain experiment

This week, an international team of physicists, including researchers at MIT, is reporting the first results from an underground experiment designed to answer one of physics’ most fundamental questions: Why is our universe made mostly of matter?

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According to theory, the Big Bang should have produced equal amounts of matter and antimatter—the latter consisting of “antiparticles” that are essentially mirror images of matter, only bearing charges opposite to those of protons, electrons, neutrons, and other particle counterparts. And yet, we live in a decidedly material universe, made mostly of galaxies, stars, planets, and everything we see around us—and very little antimatter.

Physicists posit that some process must have tilted the balance in favor of matter during the first moments following the Big Bang. One such theoretical process involves the neutrino—a particle that, despite having almost no mass and interacting very little with other matter, is thought to permeate the universe, with trillions of the ghostlike particles streaming harmlessly through our bodies every second.

There is a possibility that the neutrino may be its own antiparticle, meaning that it may have the ability to transform between a matter and antimatter version of itself. If that is the case, physicists believe this might explain the universe’s imbalance, as heavier neutrinos, produced immediately after the Big Bang, would have decayed asymmetrically, producing more matter, rather than antimatter, versions of themselves.

One way to confirm that the neutrino is its own antiparticle, is to detect an exceedingly rare process known as a “neutrinoless double-beta decay,” in which a stable isotope, such as tellurium or xenon, gives off certain particles, including electrons and antineutrinos, as it naturally decays. If the neutrino is indeed its own antiparticle, then according to the rules of physics the antineutrinos should cancel each other out, and this decay process should be “neutrinoless.” Any measure of this process should only record the electrons escaping from the isotope.

…..The results more or less indicate that, within the short window in which CUORE has so far operated, not one of the 1,000 septillion tellurium atoms in the detector underwent a neutrinoless double-beta decay. Statistically speaking, this means that it would take at least 10 septillion years, or years, for a single atom to undergo this process if a neutrino is in fact its own antiparticle.

“For tellurium dioxide, this is the best limit for the lifetime of this process that we’ve ever gotten,” Winslow says.

CUORE will continue to monitor the crystals for the next five years, and researchers are now designing the experiment’s next generation, which they have dubbed CUPID—a detector that will look for the same process within an even greater number of atoms. Beyond CUPID, Winslow says there is just one more, bigger iteration that would be possible, before scientists can make a definitive conclusion.

“If we don’t see it within 10 to 15 years, then, unless nature chose something really weird, the neutrino is most likely not its own antiparticle,” Winslow says. “Particle physics tells you there’s not much more wiggle room for the neutrino to still be its own antiparticle, and for you not to have seen it. There’s not that many places to hide.”

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Paul Gordon is the publisher and editor of iState.TV. He has published and edited newspapers, poetry magazines and online weekly magazines. He is the director of Social Cognito, an SEO/Web Marketing Company. You can reach Paul at pg@istate.tv