Will the US Claim IP On Spacex Developments?

A question by Scientific American directed at the National Council of Space Executive Secretary, Scott Pace, suggests that NASA could be pondering claiming IP on Spacex and other private company developments of heavy launch technology if the private companies hope to be contracted to build rockets for NASA.

Just to be sure you understand who is speaking here, the National Council of Space, or the National Space Council, is part of the US President’s Cabinet.  This is no think tank group, this is the government speaking.

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Pace said, “There are some people who have talked about buying heavy-lift as a service as opposed to owning and operating, in which case the government would, of course, have to continue to own the intellectual properties so it wasn’t hostage to any one contractor.”

Of coursethey would, Mr. Pace.  You let us know when you get that big black boot out of your mouth you must be sucking on when you say such idiotic things as that.

 

From Next Big Future

After wasting billions on SLS US gov will claim Spacex Heavy Launch intellectual property rights

The day-to-day leadership of the National Council of Space Executive Secretary Scott Pace. Scott Pace is the former director of the Space Policy Institute at The George Washington University.

Scientific American Asked – NASA is spending billions of dollars developing its own heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System, as the centerpiece for future exploration activities beyond low Earth orbit. But private companies like SpaceX and Blue Origin are pursuing more reusable heavy-lift vehicles of their own that may be less expensive to build and operate. Is there room for public-private partnership there, and what might that look like?

Heavy-lift rockets are strategic national assets, like aircraft carriers. There are some people who have talked about buying heavy-lift as a service as opposed to owning and operating, in which case the government would, of course, have to continue to own the intellectual properties so it wasn’t hostage to any one contractor. One could imagine this but, in general, building a heavy-lift rocket is no more “commercial” than building an aircraft carrier with private contractors would be.

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