Your Suit Will Power Your Smart Phone, and More

The electric slide gets new life with news of a new technology that could actually harvest the energy of human motion to create electricity.  Imagine wearing clothes that could one day power your smart phones?  Well….it could be cokming soon thanks to a breakthrough by Vanderbilt University’s Nanomaterials and Energy Devices Laboratory.

from sciencedaily.com
A new, ultrathin energy harvesting system developed at Vanderbilt University’s Nanomaterials and Energy Devices Laboratory has the potential to do just that. Based on battery technology and made from layers of black phosphorus that are only a few atoms thick, the new device generates small amounts of electricity when it is bent or pressed even at the extremely low frequencies characteristic of human motion.

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“In the future, I expect that we will all become charging depots for our personal devices by pulling energy directly from our motions and the environment,” said Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Cary Pint, who directed the research.

The new energy harvesting system is described in a paper titled “Ultralow Frequency Electrochemical Mechanical Strain Energy Harvester using 2D Black Phosphorus Nanosheets” published Jun.21 online by the journal ACS Energy Letters.

“This is timely and exciting research given the growth of wearable devices such as exoskeletons and smart clothing, which could potentially benefit from Dr. Pint’s advances in materials and energy harvesting,” observed Karl Zelik, assistant professor of mechanical and biomedical engineering at Vanderbilt, an expert on the biomechanics of locomotion who did not participate in the device’s development.

Currently, there is a tremendous amount of research aimed at discovering effective ways to tap ambient energy sources. These include mechanical devices designed to extract energy from vibrations and deformations; thermal devices aimed at pulling energy from temperature variations; radiant energy devices that capture energy from light, radio waves and other forms of radiation; and, electrochemical devices that tap biochemical reactions.

read more https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170721131949.htm

 

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion

A new electrochemical energy harvesting device can generate electrical current from the full range of human motions and is thin enough to embed in clothing.

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About Paul Gordon 1368 Articles

Paul Gordon is the publisher and editor of iState.TV. He has published and edited newspapers, poetry magazines and online weekly magazines.
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