3D-Printed Homes Help Families in Need in El Salvador

A non-profit company comes together with a 3D-Printed Home company to build homes for families in need in El Salvador.

They are working on creating a model 3D printed home for $4000.  The name of the non-profit is New Story.  The name of the 3D-Printed Home company is Icon, a Texas-Based company.

From ABC2News.com

A modern, 3D-printed home for $4000? Take a peek inside

For Brett Hagler, the co-founder of non-profit New Story, building homes for people without adequate shelter is nothing new.

“We get a large piece of land and work with families that have been living in shacks or tents without shelter and design a totally new community with the families.”Approximately one billion of the world’s population is without proper shelter….

….That’s where Evan Loomis comes in. He’s the co-founder of Austin, Texas-based Icon, a company focused on new technologies for building homes……

“This is a gigantic robot,” Loomis says, gesturing toward a large steel frame on wheels. “[It] really does some amazing things. Down to the millimeter it knows exactly where to place building materials.”

In this case that material is a proprietary mixture of concrete, that pours out of a nozzle on the underside of the metalwork. And the machine moves along a computerized map to create a house.

“This is basically the first permitted 3D printed house in the United States,” he said.

“We have to invest in [research and design],” Hagler said. “[We asked ourselves] ‘how do we get a breakthrough in cost, speed, and quality?’ And that’s how we landed upon 3D-home printing. The excitement in the air is palpable as they walk us through and around this modest home built up of about 100 one-inch thick concrete layers.“It’s stronger than regular cinder block,” Hagler said.

It also comes at a fraction of the cost of a regular house. This model had a price tag of about $10,000 but they hope to get the price down to $4,000.

“We can build in a fraction of the time [compared to traditional construction methods], and it can have a higher quality, strength, and sustainability for the environment.”

It was ‘printed’ in just 48 hours. Eventually, they say it will be done in just a half day. It’s a small but open floor plan — with no physical doors — and rooms are separated by partial walls made up of the printed concrete.

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