Better Living Through Microchipping

Volunteering to be microchipped for the sake of convenience?  Would you choose this?  Does this mean illuminati is confirmed for everyone now?  Is this the mark of the beast?  Or….is this just a nice technological marvel that will make our lives easier?  Personally, I dont know if it’s the mark of the beast or illuminati, but I would count myself in the “dang, that’s creepy, no thank you” crowd.

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From The Guardian

Volunteers in Melbourne have had microchips inserted for three months, designed to unlock doors and carry out other tasks. Will they really be any use?

 

….Microchips are encased in an inert glass capsule and typically inserted between the thumb and the forefinger. Photograph: Kayla Heffernan/Pause Fest

Commercially available insertable microchips are only large enough to hold one access code and a small amount of other information, so the days of replacing an entire wallet and keychain with a tiny computer under the skin are not yet upon us…..

….Ten volunteers received a microchip at the Australian Centre for the Moving Image in Melbourne on Wednesday to mark the launch of Pause Fest, a technology and culture festival now in its eighth year.

Their chips were preloaded with a three-day pass to the festival and will be programmed to unlock the door to their home, gym, or workplace, or potentially to function as their public transport pass.

When the festival is held in four months time, the volunteers will take part in a panel with Heffernan to talk about whether they found the chips useful.

Heffernan has had one microchip between her thumb and forefinger for almost 18 months, which she uses to unlock her front door. She got another on the outer edge of her other hand last November to access her office at Melbourne University.

She is doing a PhD on the applications of insertable technology and decided to get a chip after a year spent listening to people wax lyrical about the convenience of never having to carry their keys.

“If I want I can just walk out without any keys, my key is in my hand so I can’t forget it, which is handy because I have locked myself out before,” Heffernan says.

“Some people use it to unlock their phones or their computers. Some people have modified their cars and one person even their motorbike, so it’s not only access to their house but it’s access to their vehicle and to turn it on. Obviously that requires quite a bit of microelectronics and physical mechanical work, and that’s not accessible for everyone.”

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Paul Gordon is the publisher and editor of iState.TV. He has published and edited newspapers, poetry magazines and online weekly magazines.
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