Bitcoin Savvy Central Banker Might be Trump’s Next Fed Chair Pick

Donald Trump’s possible pick for the next Chairman of the Federal Reserve, Jerome H. Powell, appears to have a fairly decent understanding of bitcoin, cryptocurrencies and the technology behind it, blockchain.

This could portend well for bitcoin, or it could portend bad for digital currencies in general.  What do you think a central banking guy, running the most powerful central bank in the world, would do with the technology that goes into digital currencies?

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My bet is that dude will try to figure out how to use that technology against itself, to subvert decentralized currencies and regain control over emerging currency markets that might potentially not be controllable by the old central banking institutions.

 

From Bitcoin News

The New York Times is reporting President Trump will appoint “Jerome H. Powell as the next chairman of the Federal Reserve (Fed).” Bitcoiners all over the world will be impacted. 

President Trump is widely expected to nominate Federal Reserve Board of Governors member, Jerome H. Powell, for Senate confirmation as the next chair of the Federal Reserve. The potential Fed chair has previously stated what he sees as a tension with bitcoin as the Fed “could face difficult trade-offs between strengthening security and enabling illegal activity.”

Mr. Powell has held a Fed governor’s seat since 2012, and is currently at the relative beginning of a term that would have kept him installed until 2028.

Governor Powell appears familiar with bitcoin as a currency and Bitcoin as a network.

This spring, he gave a talk titled Innovation, Technology, and the Payments System for the Yale Law School Center for the Study of Corporate Law, during nearly half of which he spent discussing “distributed ledger technologies” (DLT) and “digital currencies.”

“Bitcoin helped bring [DLT] to public attention,” the governor began. “Using blockchain technology – which employs a form of DLT – and an open architecture, Bitcoin allows for the transfer of value (bitcoins) between participants connected to its ecosystem without reliance on banks or other trusted intermediaries,” he outlined.

Mr. Powell continued, “This feature has led some to predict that DLT will, in the long run, render parts of the banking and payments system obsolete, as the intermediation of funds through the banking system will become unnecessary.”

After detailing a few of last year’s institutional experiments with bitcoin, his remarks then turned to lessons taught by the world’s most popular cryptocurrency.

“First, in contrast to Bitcoin’s open architecture, work by the financial industry has focused on the development of ‘permissioned’ systems, which establish criteria to determine who is permitted access to particular systems, ledgers, functions, or information,” he noticed.

“Some argue that in certain markets, faster and more predictable processing will also reduce the capital and liquidity costs of operations,” the governor said. However, “technical issues remain,” such as “reliability, scalability, and security remain very important. Beyond these issues, standardization and interoperability across different versions of DLT will need to be addressed to allow technology integration and avoid market fragmentation,” Mr. Powell explained.

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