Canadian Court Rules To Erase Evidence of Genocide of First Nation People

Supreme Court of Canada Ruling Could Purge Records of Genocide, Kidnapping of First Nation Peoples

Canadian Court, Genocide, First Nation, First Nation Peoples, Supreme Court of Canada

If you know anything about Egyptian history, you’re aware of the great Pharaoh Hatshepsut who was a woman, a woman who accomplished great things.  Upon her death, her successor, Tuthmosis III, who was also her stepson, went to great pains to attempt to erase her from history, including chiseling her visage out of every monument he could find her on.  Well, the efforts to erase history were unsuccessful.  Hatshepsut has now taken her rightful place as one of the great Pharaoh of Egypt.

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It seems that history is repeating itself, and this time, it’s the Canadian government that is attempting to do away with a past they’d rather not have to face.  I suspect, in the long run, they will be just as successful erasing this terrible history as Tuthmosis III was in erasing the incredible history of his Mother-in-Law’s reign.

From The Mind Unleashed

A monumental unanimous decision on Friday from the Supreme Court of Canada states that records of horrific abuses in the nation’s baneful Indigenous residential schools must be kept confidential — and, in fact, should be destroyed.

In effect, however, the Canadian court seemed to rule in favor of erasing genocide — including the kidnapping and detention of thousands upon thousands of Indigenous and First Nations Peoples — entirely from the books.

Indigenous claimants against the government — of whom there are 38,000, if not far more — will have access to their files, and ability to request their preservation, for just 15 more years. After that, all documentation will be destroyed — erased.

“While this order may be inconsistent with the wishes of deceased claimants who were never given the option to preserve their records, the destruction of records that some claimants would have preferred to have preserved works a lesser injustice than the disclosure of records that most expected never to be shared,” the ruling states.

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About Paul Gordon 1368 Articles

Paul Gordon is the publisher and editor of iState.TV. He has published and edited newspapers, poetry magazines and online weekly magazines.
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