But for a Hero with a Gun, the Texas Church Shooting Could Have Been Much Worse

The argument goes that a good guy with a gun never stopped a mass shooting.  Well, in the case of the horror of Sutherland Springs, Texas, a shooting that claimed the lives of 26 people could have been, most likely would have been, a lot worst if it were not were the heroic efforts of an unnamed man who stopped the attack by shooting the killer.

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Details from Grabien:

Today’s mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, was only halted after an armed Texan “engaged” the killer and put an end to the rampage, the Texas Rangers reported.

Freeman Martin, a major in the Texas Rangers and a spokesman for the Texas Department of Public Safety, says the suspect dropped his rifle and fled after being confronted by a local man who had grabbed his rifle.

Freeman provided a timeline of the tragedy in a press briefing Sunday evening.

“At approximately 11:20 this morning a suspect was seen at a Valero gas station in Sutherland Springs, Texas,” Martin said. “He was dressed in all black. That suspect crossed the street to the church, exited his vehicle and began firing at the church.”

“That suspect then moved to the right side of the church and then continued to fire,” he continued. “That suspect entered the church and continued to fire. As he exited the church, a local resident grabbed his rifle and engaged that suspect. The suspect dropped his rifle, which was a Ruger AR assault-type rifle and fled from the church.”

“Our local citizen pursued the suspect at that time,” Freeman went on. “A short time later as law enforcement responded that suspect right at the Wilson/Guadalupe County line crashed out and was found deceased in his vehicle. At this time we don’t know if it was a self-inflicted gunshot wound or if he was shot by the local resident. We know he’s deceased in the vehicle. ”

Freeman (reported), “The suspect has not been completely identified. We believe he’s a young white male, maybe in his early 20s. He was dressed in all black, tactical type gear and was wearing a ballistic vest.”

…..Another local man, Johnnie Langendorff, said he was outside the church when he saw the good samaritan in a gunfight with the killer; after the killer tried making a getaway, Langendorff gave the good samaritan a ride, and they engaged in a high-speed chase. . Watch Langendorff recount his role in helping hasten the killer’s demise. 

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According to law enforcement officials, a local Sutherland Springs, Texas, resident confronted 26-year-old Devin Patrick Kelley after he opened fire on parishioners in the town’s First Baptist Church.

CNN reports that when Kelly opened fire on the church with a semi-automatic AR-15 rifle, a local resident grabbed his own rifle and engaged Kelly, causing him to stop firing on the church, get into a vehicle and run. From there, a chase ensued and Kelly ended up dead. It’s not clear if the resident shot Kelly or if he died from a self-inflicted gunshot.

The resident who engaged Kelly ran into a man’s truck to chase him. That man, Johnnie Langendorff, told his story to local news stations.

Langendorff told local news station KSAT-TV that he saw the unnamed resident engaging in fire with Kelly. That’s when the resident ran to his truck and they began chasing Kelly. All the while, they were communicating with dispatchers.

Langendorff said the chase reached speeds of up to 95 mph before Kelly lost control of his vehicle and crashed. Langendorff said the unnamed resident then held Kelly at gunpoint. Sometime after the crash is when Kelly died, though it’s not clear when.

“[I was] just trying to get him, to get him apprehended or whatever needed to happened. I mean it was just strictly acting on what the right thing to do was,” Langendorff said

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Paul Gordon is the publisher and editor of iState.TV. He has published and edited newspapers, poetry magazines and online weekly magazines.
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