New Material Reduces Fuel Cell Cost Significantly

A new catalyst material for fuel cells promises to lower the cost of fuel cells significantly, while also raising the efficiency for them.

The catalyst material was developed by a team out of the University of California, Riverside.

Making fuel cells for a fraction of the cost

In a paper published today in Small, researchers at the University of California, Riverside, describe the development of an inexpensive, efficient catalyst material for a type of fuel cell called a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), which turns the chemical energy of hydrogen into electricity and is among the most promising fuel cell types to power cars and electronics.

The catalyst developed at UCR is made of porous carbon nanofibers embedded with a compound made from a relatively abundant metal such as cobalt, which is more than 100 times less expensive than platinum. The research was led by David Kisailus, the Winston Chung Endowed Professor in Energy Innovation in UCR’s Marlan and Rosemary Bourns College of Engineering.

Read More at Science Daily
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